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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic

Far East Adventure Travel. Inspiring, entertaining. Let John Saboe take you on journeys filled with spiritual celebrations and rituals, ancient festivals, wildlife safaris, trekking and climbing quests and vast array of food cultures. Learn about village life, cultural differences, urban exploration, street food, history and architecture. Visit Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, and Korea. Stories and advice from one of the most exciting destinations on the planet-Asia.
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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic
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Now displaying: 2017
Oct 28, 2017
https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel I rely on public support to continue sharing travel inspiration from Asia! Become a patron of Far East Adventure Travel! Visit my Patreon page now! It's alway exciting when you first arrive in a destination like Kuching, the capital of Sarawak in Malaysian Borneo. The sights, food, people, the environment as a whole. I have so many great memories of Kuching in particular because I was able to easily explore the town by foot. Meeting local people, being invited into the Sikh Gurdwara for lunch and a tour. Walking in the old Kampongs, traveling by riverboat on the Sarawak River, and meeting the warm, friendly, and hospitable people of the region. I hope this episode gives you a taste of what this amazing place on the exotic island of Borneo has to offer! YouTube-https://www.youtube.com/user/shngmn
Oct 26, 2017
https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Please support my continuing efforts to bring you exciting travel inspiration from Asia! Become patron of Far East Adventure Travel! Visit my Patreon page to find out more! Dream Parade is a unique event in East Asia held every October in Taipei, Taiwan. A celebration of life, freedom of expression, and creativity the parade mixes world culture with Hakka, aboriginal, and Chinese traditions plus a little essence of Burning Man. I have covered many festivals and traditional celebrations in Taiwan but this was my first time covering the Dream Parade. I've always so for a few years now that if you really want to see some amazing rituals, festivals, and traditions no one puts on a celebration quite like the Taiwanese do and Dream Parade is no exception. A mix of Mardi Gras, and Brazil's Carnival in spirit the parade itself features aboriginal groups in drumming and dance sessions, stilt walkers, fire-eaters, giant floats and mascots, and of course samba dancers! Hope you enjoy these highlights from Dream Parade 2017 from Taipei, Taiwan.
Oct 17, 2017
https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Become a patron of Far East Adventure Travel and support travel inspiration from Asia. Get access to exclusive content and follow the link now! A visit to Kanyakumari, India is certainly a buck list item for anyone who loves the subcontinent. Being at the very southern tip it’s a popular destination mostly for Indians seeking a pilgrimage although with the emerging middle class in the country it is becoming just as much a vacation destination combined with a spiritual journey. Having spent a few weeks traveling through Kerala it was hard to resist an extra 3 hour bumpy bus ride from Kovalam Beach to the southern tip of India. With limited time I had to literally jump off the bus, find a place to stay, and make my way for the ferry line-up to visit the small little islands, or rock outcrops that were home to shrines. The first stop on the ferry ride is at Vivekananda Rock Memorial where a shrine was built in 1970 honoring Swami Vivekananda who was believed to have attained enlightenment on the rock. The second stop was at The Thiruvalluvar Statue. The statue that rises 29 meters symbolizes wealth and pleasures. After I finished my trip to the monuments I explored the small town that must swell daily with tourists and pilgrims that arrive by bus, car, and train. It’s definitely a circus atmosphere, with carnival acts, horse rides, and a little amusement park for kids. Of course besides the other temples that pilgrims and followers make their way to including The Kanya Kumari Temple and The Gandhi Memorial Mandapam, the site where the great Mahatma’s ashes were kept before their final immersion. Just to see and meet Indians, many that had travelled hundreds of kilometers was absolutely fascinating. Of course the top attraction for most are the incredible sunrises and sunsets, provided the weather is cooperative. We had an amazing sunset, the next day unfortunately overcast skies and light rains prevailed. Nevertheless it was one of the memorable adventures I’d ever experienced in India.
Oct 4, 2017
https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Get access to exclusive content and insider info on my travels! Become a patron now! Visit my Patreon page and check out the offers! I was so glad to see the Taoyuan International Airport MRT line open earlier this year. This finally brings Taipei in line as far as convenience and access goes, to it’s international airport, with other major cities in East Asia including Seoul, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Southeast Asian centers like Singapore and Kuala Lumpur. Like most airport trains across Asia they do not operate 24 hours a day so if your flight arrives outside of the 6am to 23:00 train schedule then you’ll have to use a bus, still fairly convenient or catch a taxi. At NT$160 for a one way ticket the Taoyuan Airport MRT is the bargain of East Asia for airport rail fares. As I mentioned in the video Taipei Metro offers a number of unlimited passes ranging from 24 hours to 72 hours. These passes are not valid for the airport MRT. If you’d like an unlimited pass that includes a return trip on the airport MRT then purchase the “Joint Ticket” at the airport MRT counter. At the airport and at Taipei Main Station you can purchase an Easy Card or iPass which you can load up and use on the airport MRT, Taipei Metro, many bus lines and convenience stores. This video should cover most of your questions regarding travel between the international airport and Taipei Main Station. For more information visit their website:https://www.tymetro.com.tw/eng/index.php
Sep 26, 2017
https://fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Please visit my crowdfunding page! Your donation will help me upgrade video equipment to bring you better broadcasts and content from Asia! There has been much talk lately about the elimination of food stalls and carts on many of the streets in Bangkok, Thailand. On my most recent visit this was very evident in places like Pratunam where there used to me non-stop food carts on the streets of this mega shopping district. While exploring Chinatown it seemed like there were still many food carts on the streets and alleys but it’s possible there are not as many as there once was. This is a continuation of a live video stream from my exploration around Chinatown. Discovering electronics markets, exotic foods, and temples is what I consider one of the great joys of traveling. Having the time to just wander without the pressure of ticking off a list of attractions or sites is liberating. I hope you enjoy this casual walk through the streets of one of the most visited cities in the world, Bangkok, Thailand.
Sep 26, 2017
https://fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Please visit my crowdfunding page. Donations help towards purchasing new video equipment. Thanks for your support! Follow me on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/johnsaboeofficial/ Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/fareastadventuretravel/ Bangkok is one of my favorite cities in Southeast Asia. A modern city that's retained much of it's cultural heritage, it's fast-paced, vast, naughty, and filled with temples, markets, amazing food, entertainment and world-class shopping. It's also where you can find one of Southeast Asia's most vibrant Chinatowns. In this episode I explored some of the interesting lanes and streets where you can find everything from durian, the king of fruit, to Chinese medicinal remedies, fantastic street food, restaurants, and stores filled with gadgets, kitchen utensils, and pottery. I'm also looking forward to very soon bringing you live broadcasts from Asia on BlogTalkRadio and a chance to connect with you either by phone or Skype-stay tuned! Write a review for Far East Adventure Travel:https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/adventure-travel-far-east-inspired-by-rick-steves-lonely/id1079513943?mt=2
Sep 19, 2017
https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Check out the offers on my Patreon page to become a sponsor and patron of Far East Adventure Travel!Follow me on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/johnsaboeofficial/ Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/fareastadventuretravel/ What a thrill it was to watch the giant feast offering for the hungry ghosts at the recent “Pudu” ritual at Taipei, Taiwan’s Provincial City God Temple. During the 7th month of every lunar calendar year ghosts or “good brothers”, as they are politely referred to by Taiwanese, walk the earth potentially causing trouble for the living. Food, drink, other offerings, and prayers are offered to appease the wandering ghosts. Taiwan Provincial City God Temple in Taipei City, Taiwan holds one of the biggest “Pudus” on the 25th day of the lunar calendar month. The Taipei City mayor is invited every year to help initiate the event and thousands show up throughout the day to bring offerings of food, drink, and other items and watch the rites performed with help of Taoist and Buddhist monks. The local media was out in full force to cover the event and would probably out number any North American city of the same size. I was impressed with the amount and variety food that was brought to the Taiwan Provincial City God Temple and my friend Wayne Chen shared with me that many of the items are donated to charity as well as local aboriginal tribes in Central and Southern Taiwan once the rites have been completed at the Pudu. I want to thank the director of the temple Chan Ling Chuan and Wayne Chen for inviting me to the Pudu along with all of the wonderful volunteers that work very hard to put together this event. Taiwan is an amazing place filled with a fascinating rich vibrant culture. I hope on your visit you are exposed to these great festivals and rituals and the hospitality of the Taiwanese. fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements I am in desperate need of upgrades to my video equipment. Please visit my crowdfunding page. If you enjoy these videos I create a donation will help me to bring you better quality content from Taiwan and across Asia. Thank you! John
Sep 13, 2017
https://fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements/dash Please support my crowdfunding efforts to raise money for new video equipment to bring you better videos and podcasts from Asia. $5, $10, $20 or more is most gratefully appreciated! This was truly an interesting experience visiting the Yimin Festival in Hsinchu County. My friend MJ and I set out to see one of the most unique cultural events in Taiwan, The Pigs Of God that are offered every year for the Yimin Festival held during the 7th month of the lunar calendar in Hsinchu County and other communities where Hakka people reside. The Hakka are the second largest ethnic group of Taiwan with a population of approximately 4.6 million in total, with the majority of the population residing in Hsinchu, Taoyuan, and Miaoli Counties in Taiwan. The Yimin Festival has become a controversial cultural event, mostly for the pigs that are purposely force-fed to extreme weights of over 800kg. This tradition actually does not go back to the beginning of the event but only began a few decades ago. Some influencial people in the Hakka community have called for the end of the force-feeding practise but it still continues today in many communities around Taiwan including Hsinchu county. After discovering the Pigs of God are not on display at the Yimin Temple in Hsinpu, one of the most significant temples and cultural centers of Hsinchu County we got directions to the closest site where we could see some of the pigs on display. To my surprise the event, held at one spot in Zhubei City this year, was not entirely made up of the force-fed pigs, but also included regularly raised pigs that were slaughtered for the festival. People also bring goats, chickens, and ducks, to offer Yimin. In Hakka culture Yimin are actually men that lost their lives defending the Qing Dynasty from rebels in the 18th century. You can read more about them here:https://festival.hakka.gov.tw/Festival-Content.aspx?a=816&l=2 https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Become a patron of Far East Adventure Travel and gain access to exclusive content! Check out my Patreon page to see the offers! Thanks so much for watching the video! Subscribe to my channel for more videos on Taiwan, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia.
Sep 13, 2017
https://fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements/dash Please support my crowdfunding efforts to raise money for new video equipment to bring you better videos and podcasts from Asia. $5, $10, $20 or more is most gratefully appreciated! Ghost Month or The Hungry Ghost Festival takes place every year during the 7th month of the lunar calendar in Taiwan and other parts of Asia. This is the 15th day of the month which is also called Ghost Day. During Ghost month it’s believed the gates of the underworld are opened for the spirits to wander the earth, many without descendants. Offerings of food and drink are set out and ghost money is burned for the ghosts, or good brothers, a more respectful term the Taiwanese use. So why do they treat the ghosts this way? Because of the potential for disruption by the wandering ghosts during the month many people in Taiwan avoid travel, swimming, holding weddings, and putting off major purchases like a car or house. https://www.patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Become a patron of Far East Adventure Travel and gain access to exclusive travel content from Asia. Visit my page to see the offers!
Aug 31, 2017
fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Thanks so much for visiting my crowdfunding page! Your support will help me to create even better podcasts from Asia! Bangkok, Thailand has been one of the top 3 cities visited in the world for some time now. It's no surprise when you start discovering what Bangkok is all about. History, tradition, culture, shopping, food, and notorious red light districts. It's also of course a hub for Southeast Asia and a bridge to the middle east and Europe. On my most recent visit I saw for myself the clear sidewalks void of the famous street vendors of Bangkok. This has been reported for many weeks now but this was my first-hand look at the current street food situation. There are stalls to be found if you look around Chinatown, some of the tourist streets like Khao San Road but the vendors are gone all around Pratunam and the streets around Siam Paragon and Central World. It's disappointing but it's happening around other major cities in Southeast Asia, like Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi. Governments in some cases want the sidewalks free of clutter so it's safer for pedestrians. That's certainly a valid concern for a city like Ho Chi Minh where it can be quite dangerous walking around stalls and parked motorbikes. It may just be the new reality of Southeast Asia. It may also be an opportunity for countries like Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar that are still considerably undeveloped and have plenty of growth opportunity with their tourism industries compared with a giant like Thailand. Regardless Bangkok is still an amazing city worth spending several days visiting. You'll no doubt end up in Pratunam, considered by most the center of modern and luxury shopping in Southeast Asia. Join me for an evening walk in Bangkok's shopping mecca district.
Aug 29, 2017
fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Thanks so much for taking the time to view my crowdfunding page. I continue to strive to bring you better video content from Asia. I'm extremely grateful for your support whether it's $5, $10, $20 or more. In order for me to make what I do sustainable I need to expand my video on YouTube as well as continue to grow my livestreaming base and of course what started it all, the video podcast! Thank you for your support! For me a visit to Bangkok is not complete without a trip to see the Erawan Shrine, in the heart of Pratunam and the shopping district. The contrast between modern shopping, elevated trains, and the 4 headed Brahma shrine is sharp and unlike any city in the west. Unfortunately the shrine gained international attention in August 2015 when a bomb was set off there killing 20 people and injuring 125. Today there is still no conclusive evidence of who or why the bomb was detonated at the shrine. The Erawan Shrine was actually placed on this site because of bad luck believed to have been caused by laying the foundation for the Erawan Hotel on the wrong date. The builders consulted an astrologer who advised them to put the shrine on the site to counter the bad karma. In 1987 the Erawan Hotel was demolished making room for the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel. Thai traditional dancers sing and perform for worshippers who pay a fee. You can order the full deck of dancers-8, or just 2 who will sing and dance while you pray. A live band accompanies the singers. The music, singing, and intense smell of incense against the backdrop of the biggest shopping district in Southeast Asia is intoxicating and addictive. I'll always visit the Erawan Shrine!
Aug 19, 2017
patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel - Please visit my Patreon page to see the latest offers. For as little as $1/month you can get access to exclusive content. It's always challenging when you visit any city for the first time to decide on where exactly you want to stay. This video highlights my 5 favorite districts to stay in Taipei. The characteristics of each district are highlighted to make it easier to decide which one suits you best. Technically Taipei Main Station is not a district but falls in Zhongzheng but I think it's better to use Taipei Main Station when you're searching for hotels and other retail or services. The districts fall in order of transportation convenience with number 1 Taipei Main Station being the best and Xinyi District the area furthest away. Taipei City is not that expansive so if you stay in Xinyi it will take you approximately 20 minutes to get to Taipei Main Station by MRT. Zhongshan is convenient and has a some nice sites to visit including the Ningxia Night Market, Dihua Old Street, The Museum of Contemporary Art. Daan is great for shoppers, foodies, bar hoppers, and some nice parks and neighborhoods to explore. Ximending is the most energetic district with lots of choices for food, cafes, entertainment, street performers, and is completely safe even with the crowds that inhabit the place every night. Xinyi is the most luxurious of all the districts with the best selection of 5 star hotels, international restaurants, Chinese/Taiwanese fine dining, and the best Japanese food. Bars, hot nightclubs and one of the best selections of luxury goods stores in East Asia. Thanks so much for watching the video! Please subscribe to the channel for the latest videos from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia! Music: http://www.purple-planet.com
Aug 7, 2017
Far East Adventure Travel relies on viewer support to cover travel, broadcast, and production costs! Become a sponsor and patron now! Visit patreon.com to see exclusive offers: I thought it might be interesting for those who subscribe to the podcast and are curious about life in a place that faces typhoons regularly and might be traveling to Taiwan in the future see what it’s like to go through the hours leading up to a typhoon. I get many followers asking me about safety and what to do before and during a typhoon in Taiwan. I’m also thinking that Taiwanese who follow the channel will find it humorous to watch a foreigner talk about a typhoon and how we perhaps perceive it as more of an event than just an actual weather occurrence. I mentioned focustaiwan.tw as a good English language resource for foreigners in Taiwan. Taiwan television always has extensive coverage leading up to and during a typhoon but unfortunately it is only available in Mandarin. Of course you can also use apps like Windy or Storm to give you up to date weather information but I like Focus Taiwan for comprehensive coverage which includes transportation and other useful information. Of course flights will most likely be delayed or cancelled during a typhoon so if you do have travel plans that fall close to a typhoon you’ll have to stay up to date with your airlines as flights will either be delayed, or in some cases moved up to depart earlier than scheduled. The government can also call a “typhoon day” which means all services, offices, and schools will be closed. If a “typhoon day” is called it may also mean that many stores will be closed. Having some extra food and drinks on hand can be helpful if you’re in a smaller town or city in Taiwan but I’ve found especially if you’re in Taipei there are usually enough stores, cafes, and restaurants open to find something to eat. Of course this will also depend on the severity of the typhoon so there are exceptions. Having been through several typhoons now I am much more used to them as just part of the weather season but I still find following and tracking a typhoon extremely fascinating. Help others discover Far East Adventure Travel! Write a review in the iTunes Store:
Aug 3, 2017
Kyoto is located in the central part of Honshu Island, Japan and was the imperial capital of the country for over a thousand years. It is also known as the City of Ten Thousand Shrines. It is an absolute must see on a visit to Japan. To get some expert advice on how best to spend your time and get the most out of your stay in the city I spoke with Niall Gibson expert guide, travel planner and managing director of kyotofun.com and myjapanadventure.com. from his home Kyoto. And please some advice on how to conduct yourself in this polite culture. I first set off on foot near the Yasaka Shrine To get a feel for the city. Wait a minute what the hell is this? Hari Kirshnas? In Kyoto? Well it’s an international city so anything is possible but not my idea of traditional Japanese culture. So I moved on to the Heian Shrine. It is a top ranked shrine by the Association of Shinto Shrines. Heian dates back to 1895, a relatively short history compared to other important temples and shrines in Japan. Outside the shrine on a busy road in Kyoto sits It’s Torii Gate, one of the largest in Japan. Built in 1929 it’s over 24 meters high. A torri gate symbolizes the transition from the profane to the sacred. The orange, green and white buildings inside are meant to be replicas of the old Kyoto Imperial Palace. The Heian Shrine’s gardens are some of the most impressive in all of Japan. If you’re timing is good you’ll see a stunning display of cherry blossoms in the spring. If you’re timing is good…. No matter what time of year taking a stroll through the gardens is a true zen experience, and hey you can even step over these stones. The same ones Scarlett Johansson hopped over in “Lost In Translation”. I left the Heian Shrine totally refreshed from my walk through the gardens and headed back to Gion to take a walk through this traditional neighborhood, where I’ve been told real Geisha’s can be seen. Actually the correct term or name for a Geisha in Kyoto is Geiko and an apprentice is called a Maiko. But my best sighting was just the many tourists who come and dress up in traditional kimonos and walk around and pose for pictures. I took another suggestion from Niall and made my way to Arishiyama, about a 30 minute train ride from central Kyoto to see the Tenru ji Buddhist Temple and finish off my visit with a walk through the world-famous Bamboo Grove. Arishiyama is home to several temples and interesting sites to see including a monkey park where over 170 monkeys reside. It’s also a spectacular place to visit for the beautiful scenery of the surrounding mountains, especially during the spring and fall. I made my way to Tenru ji-the head temple of the Tenru branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism. Construction was completed in 1345 but the temple has subsequently suffered through many fires and the buildings that currently stand here were reconstructed in the last half of the 19 and early 20th centuries. Tenru ji is surrounded by beautiful gardens and was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1994. It’s North Gate is the entrance to the famous Sagano Bamboo Grove. It’s no coincidence that bamboo gardens or groves in Japan are usually situated near Shinto Shrines or Buddhist Temples. The bamboo represents strength, a symbol intended to ward off evil.If you want to truly experience the wonder of this place and it’s magical sounds, visit early in the morning or late in the day. That’s it for this week’s Far East Adventure Travel Podcast. Don’t forget to like the Far East Adventure Travel page on Facebook and for more inspiration subscribe to John Saboe on YouTube:http://bit.ly/2ni8SSjyoutube visit fareastadventuretravel.com Until next time this is John Saboe. Safe travels and Namaste!
Aug 1, 2017
Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park is made up of 5 small islands between 5-8 kilometers off of Kota Kinabalu in Sabah Malaysian Borneo. In this episode I’m heading for one of the smallest, Pulau Sapi, or Cow Island. It’s one of the least developed areas of the park. Great beaches, diving and snorkeling with a bonus chance of seeing some monitor lizards up close in the wild. Sapi Island can be reached by boat from the Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal in KK. You can purchase a ticket directly to the island or get a multi-island ticket. This is a half-day or day trip for most. There are no hotels on Sapi but with prior permission from the park’s office you could camp there. Pulau Gaya, the largest island in the group at 3700 acres compared to Sapi at just 25 has resorts and more amenities. This is one of the finest beaches in the park. I’ll spend a little time here but first I’ll do a quick hike around the island where I may see the lizards and some macaques. This is the map I had to work with, not exactly detailed but the island is only 25 acres. In the worst case I’ll just swim if I get lost on land. Right out of the gate I get a quick glimpse of a monitor lizard but it quickly dashes into the forest. The trail that runs the perimeter of the island takes about 45 minutes to hike around with some nice little private beaches you can stop at along the way. Here’s a pretty cool adventure. Take a boat to Pulau Gaya, then zipline to Pulau Sapi. You can reach speeds of up to 50km/hr on the 250 meter crossing of the two islands. It’s also possible to swim from island to island, but as there are no lifeguards there, do it at your own risk. Back near the center of activity on Sapi close to the main beach and bbq area I found the biggest gathering of monitor lizards. These are actually water monitors, locally they’re called biawak. The males can reach up to 3 meters in length and weigh up to 50 kilos. They are very adept at swimming, and can stay underwater for up to a half-hour so watch out! You may see them catching a wave next to you. They’re more scavenger then predator so you probably won’t find them attacking people unless you get to close in their space, like some foolish tourists who try to include them in their selfie. These lizards carry a deadly bacteria in their mouth and their claws could tear a sizable chunk of flesh out of you so be careful. Monitors defend themselves with their tails, claws and jaws. These lizards are carnivores and will eat birds, rodents, snakes, crabs and even carrion, similiar to their bigger cousin The Komodo Dragon. Their main hunting technique is to run after their prey once spotted. They also have an amazing one way breathing system that can be traced back to dinosaurs. Pulau Sapi was a great half-day getaway from Kota Kinabalu and in between bigger Borneo trips. An easy boat ride gets you to a pretty nice spot for beach, relaxation, absorbing recent travel and cultural experiences, and even a little exotic animal viewing. It’s back on the boat to KK and more adventure in Malaysian Borneo with Far East Adventure Travel The Podcast, I’m John Saboe, Thanks for joining me, safe travels and Namaste!. "KKMap3". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:KKMap3.png#/media/File:KKMap3.png
Jul 29, 2017
Support production, broadcast, and travel costs by becoming a sponsor of Far East Adventure Travel! Visit my Patreon page to see the offers:patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel I find the history and relationships Taiwan has had with nations like the United States and Japan absolutely fascinating. Unfortunately due to the development and rapid growth particularly of Taipei and New Taipei City many buildings that were apart of the history of America's years of on island support are gone. The old U.S. Embassy has been replaced by the National Taxation Bureau. The U.S. Taiwan Defence Command is now the location of The Taipei Fine Arts Museum. I sense though that there are still places out there to be discovered and shared. Video Script: "In Zhongshan District, a vibrant area of Taipei where many luxury hotels are located sits an iconic building of the neighborhood with a past life deep rooted in American history. When it was first built the former U.S. Ambassador’s residence was originally used as the U.S. Embassy during the Japanese colonial period of Taiwan. At the time of it’s completion in 1926 it was considered one of the most beautiful buildings on the island. The Western design with square floor plan and Grecian columns originally served as an administrative office as well as living quarters for the ambassadors and their families. When the United States established a new embassy after WWII this became the residence of the ambassador. I liked that this building has been repurposed as a venue for films and a meeting place rather than a museum. I felt sitting in it’s converted atrium and enjoying the surroundings in an unhurried manner had alot more value as an experience then a walk through a building with roped off areas. Not only did I have a great time hanging out where a U.S. President once stayed I had a pretty interesting selection of movies I could choose to watch, from a documentary about an American photographer turned Buddhist monk to a Japanese man living with a bunch of cats. In 1950 the United States started deploying U.S. military personnel to the island to aid the Republic of China with training, support, and economic relief. Special Western style housing was built for personnel including this almost 14 hectare site in the Yangmingshan area of Taipei City where many houses still remain today. Some of the houses have been leased from the Bank of Taiwan and are occupied by local politicians, artists, and personnel of the American Institute in Taiwan, the defacto U.S. Embassy in Taipei. But it appears many are cafes. The most recent building of the U.S. Taiwan Defense Command era to spring back to life is the Yangminghsan U.S. Military Club, now a Cultural and Creative Park with American style restaurants. This was also the home of the Grass Mountain Teen Club for personnel families. The Bank of Taiwan and a local tech company have invested over $3 million dollars in the renovation which includes a vinyl listening room and museum. Yes they passed the taste test and there are some beautiful grounds and a rooftop deck to enjoy the spectacular Yangminghan Park setting." Getting To The Yangmingshan U.S. Military Housing and Brickyard 33 1/3:Take the Red Line MRT to Shilin, leave Exit 1 and walk to Zhongzheng Rd. Catch Bus #5 to Yangmingshan. The ride will be approximately 20 minutes before you'll get off at the Shanzihou Police Station stop. Walk across the street to Kaixuan Rd. You'll see signs for Brickyard, just follow those and you'll arrive there in about 5 minutes. This is also where you'll see many of the military houses that are either private, cafes, or empty. Getting To the Former U.S. Amassador's Residence(SPOT Taipei Film House) take the MRT Red Line to Zhongshan Station. Walk West along Nanjing East Road to Zongshan Rd. North. turn left and walk to #18. photos courtesy of http://taipics.com music: http://www.purple-planet.com
Jul 24, 2017
Support Far East Adventure Travel by becoming a patron! Visit patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel to see exclusive offers starting at $1/month! Support Far East Adventure Travel by becoming a patron! Visit:patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Mumbai is a fantastic city to visit with plenty of sites, heritage buildings, amazing street and restaurants. There are some things you need to be prepared for before you arrive. As I stated in part I you need to pace yourself to the incredibly stifling climate with breaks in air conditioned cafes, restaurants or shops. Staying hydrated is extremely important as any sign of fatigue will cause you problems with the next challenge, dealing with beggars. This unfortunately is the reality of major Indian cities and the beggars of Mumbai are relentless. Watching how locals react when they are approached is a great way to learn. You’ll notice that they do not respond at all to them and in fact are almost oblivious to their presence. This is probably the best way to handle beggars. If they see no reaction and cannot disturb you in any way they usually give up. The beggars job is not just to make you sympathetic, they are trying to agitate you in any way they can. If you get angry, frustrated, or emotional at all, they will continue to bother you until you give in. If you act like they aren’t there they’ll give up. You should always be cautious of where you are taking photographs around Mumbai. With a history of terrorist attacks police and authorities are sensitive to photography around certain sites. Photography is not permitted at the high and low courts, inside the C.S.T. train station, and the Bombay Stock Exchange. There was a heritage tour inside C.S.T. that apparently allowed photography but I’m not sure if it still exists. It’s always best to ask either security or if there are police at a particular site you’re interested in photographing. Crawford Market officially renamed Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market after a 19th century social reformer is one of the most famous markets of Mumbai where you can get everything from fish to fruits and vegetables and even live birds, dogs, cats, and other pets. Here’s a somewhat unconventional thing to do when visiting Mumbai. Head to Bandra in West Mumbai, considered the queen of suburbs and home to many famous politicians, cricket players, and Bollywood stars including one of the biggest ever, Shah Rukh Khan. Check out the locals who often hang outside his mansion waiting to catch a glimpse of the King of Bollywood! OK, let’s try talking to someone else. You can also visit the homes of Amitabh Bachchan, considered one of India’s greatest cinema actors of all time. Most taxi and autorickshaw drivers of the area know where all of these mansions are located. They’re happy to take you there! Thanks so much for watching the video! If you enjoyed it please give me a thumbs up and subscribe to the channel for more videos from East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia! Photo Credits-Shah Rukh Khan, Amitabh Bachchan:By http://www.bollywoodhungama.com Music:http://www.purple-planet.com
Jul 18, 2017
Thanks so much for listening and subscribing to the podcast. Mumbai is one of my favorite cities to visit in India. Not only is it loaded with atmosphere and amazing heritage buildings from the British raj, it’s also where you can find some of the best street food and restaurants in the country. One of the most enjoyable experiences for me was sampling the incredible street food in Kala Ghoda and the row of stalls across the street from CST. Not only are the dishes absolutely delicious but the atmosphere in which they are consumed is wonderful with lawyers taking a break from the nearby law courts in traditional robes mixing with everyday working people from the area. There are definitely things to be cautious of when walking around Mumbai, especially the traffic which can be overwhelming for some. As well you will soon see that locals do not wait for green lights to cross a street so if you want to follow in their footsteps, extreme caution is advised. Beggars are also a concern. As a foreigner you will no doubt be approached by many. Unless you want a parade of them following you it’s best not to give them anything. They also approach locals but you will quickly notice that natives will not give them the time of day and simply move on as if they are not affected by the encounter. Showing no emotion will show them there is no hope so they will move on. Pacing yourself in the tropical heat and humidity is also extremely important. As I mention in the podcast, taking breaks in cafes and museums throughout your day of exploring will help you stay comfortable. Support Far East Adventure Travel with your pledge to my Patreon page! Visit now and discover great offers starting at $1/month:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4035923 Write a Review in the iTunes Store and help others discover Far East Adventure Travel: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/adventure-travel-far-east-inspired-by-rick-steves-lonely/id890305531?mt=2
Jul 13, 2017
Taipei, Taiwan is a vibrant city that is rich in culture, history, street food, and religion. It’s safe, super-friendly, convenient and probably undervalued compared to the super Asian city destinations of Hong Kong, Tokyo, Singapore, Seoul. Ironically many residents of those cities choose Taipei as a destination, enjoying some of those qualities that their city once had or simply lacks. Why the title 8+3 Awesome Sights To See/Do? Well most in Asia would be clued in to the significance of the number 8 and 3. In Chinese,(Mandarin), the word eight sounds similar to the word for prosper or wealth. It’s also similar sounding in Cantonese. The number 8 is an auspicious number. The number three sounds similar to the character for birth and is also considered a lucky number. There are three stages to a person’s life-birth, marriage, and death. So my wish is for prosperity and good luck for all those that visit Taipei, Taiwan and for the people of the city that have treated me with such great kindness and hospitality for the past 4 years. Would love to get your feedback on the video and ideas for future content. Also what other countries do you like to visit in Asia? Thanks again with many blessings to you! John Here is the list of the 8+3 sights with links for more details on transportation and extra background for your preparation. 8.Dihua Street:http://eng.taiwan.net.tw/m1.aspx?sNo=0002090&id=418 7.Dongmen:https://guidetotaipei.com/visit/yongkang-street-永康街 6.National Palace Museum:https://www.npm.gov.tw/en/ 5.Ximending:https://guidetotaipei.com/visit/ximending-youth-shopping-district-西門町 4.C.K.S. Memorial Hall:http://www.cksmh.gov.tw/eng/index.php?code=list&ids=21 3.Longshan Temple:http://lungshan.org.tw/en/index.php 2.Shilin Night Market:http://www.shilin-night-market.com/how-to-get-to.html#.WWMSz1KB10s 1.Taipei 101:http://www.taipei-101.com.tw/en/index.aspx Din Tai Fung:http://www.dintaifung.com.tw/tw/default.htm Kao Chi:http://www.kao-chi.com King Mango:http://www.kingmango.com.tw/index.html +3 3.Beitou Hot Springs:https://guidetotaipei.com/visit/beitou-hot-springs-北投溫泉-xinbeitou 2.Songshan Cultural And Creative Park:http://www.songshanculturalpark.org/en/ 1.Elephant Mountain(Xiangshan):https://guidetotaipei.com/visit/elephant-mountain-象山-xiangshan Please check out my Patreon page for exclusive content and offers:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4035923
Jul 10, 2017
Wine And Gourmet Taipei was one of the most challenging wine shows I’ve ever been invited to in the world. With a tasting selection ranging from Shochu, a Japanese distilled beverage, vodka like, to Australian Shiraz. Typically I would start at a traditional wine tasting with sparkling wine, moving on to light then more full bodied whites like Chardonnay, then the reds from Pinot Noir to Cabs then maybe if I’ve got anything left in me, ports and sherries. But there’s no way I could handle a diverse range of Japanese sake, shochu, craft beers, many fruit flavored ones, then an assortment of wines. The palate just can’t absorb all those flavors and intensities over a 3-4 hour period. So being in Asia I decided to focus on Asian alcohol and craft beers, including the emerging craft beer segment in Taiwan. Managing to finally pull myself away from the dazzling selection of Japanese Shochu and sake I made my way to the many Belgian beers that are available around Taiwan and the island’s homegrown craft beers including Bazu and Taiwan Head Brewers. I am really impressed with the range of beers, the quality and taste, and the actual infusions and flavors from Litchi, very refreshing and thirst quenching, to sour beers, tea infused beers, chocolate and more from the homegrown market. Craft brews are still relatively new compared with the North American market but interest, particularly with the younger generation is growing in Taiwan. Some purists might be put off by some of the fruit beers but I personally think they suite not only local food, but the climate, especially in Northern Taiwan with it’s extremely hot and humid summers. Nothing like quenching your thirst with a refreshing light litchi beer with maybe a plate of spicy squid on the side. Get exclusive travel content! Visit Patreon and become a sponsor of Far East Adventure Travel: http://www.purple-planet.com
Jun 30, 2017
Bukhansan National Park is almost 80 sq/km in size and is located so close to the urban area of Seoul, South Korea that it’s possible to take the subway here, like I did on this visit. I started out in Insadong and transferred to line number 1 and rode the train until the very last stop of Dobongsan, which is actually the name of the mountain I’m going to hike up today. I think it’s important wherever you are hiking to stake out a place to have a beer or coffee and something to eat afterwards,. Some motivation or a reward to think about as you’re making your way to the top and of course something to contemplate as you safely get back down. It’s a bit of a hike itself just to get to the entrance of the park from the subway station, passing through what seems like a galleria of hiking and outdoor stores, Koreans love their outdoor gear. Plus there’s loads of restaurants and stalls selling food. I’m going to grab some gimbap, Korea’s version of sushi, the perfect picnic or hiking meal. Some say gimbap was inspired by the tekkamaki sushi rolls eaten by the Japanese soldiers that were present here during Japan’s rule of the country. Others say it is totally an original food of Korea, Either its the perfect dish to stuff in my backpack along with some kimchi, Korea’s national spicy pickled cabbage dish. Finally it feels like I’ve arrived in the park or at least I’m alot closer. I spot this very cool relief style map of Bukhansan and all of the mountains that are hikeable. Rock climbing is also a huge sport here. Bukhansan National Park was established in 1983. Being so close to the urban sprawl of Seoul, which is the third largest urban area in the world and an area population of over 25 million it’s a very popular recreation area. In fact at least 5 million people visit the park every year making it the most visited national park per square kilometer in the world. Another added feature of hiking in Bukhansan National park are the Buddhist temples that are scattered throughout the mountains. The first one I come across is Gwangnyun-sa. Shaminism was widely practised in Korea before the introduction of Buddhism in 372. Because Buddhism did not conflict with the nature worship of shaminism it was allowed to blend with the indigenous religion. Because spirits were believed to inhabit the mountains in pre-Buddhist times they became the home to many temples. The trails here are well marked so it’s pretty easy to stay on course. Dobongsan mountain is made up of 5 peaks and on this day I will go to it’s highest, Jaunbong Peak at 740m. It’s not a hard hike if you are in reasonably good shape. OK Mr. positive I would like to see some amazing views but It’s just not going to happen today. Too bad because this peak looks absolutely spectacular from this photo point image. Even with a little light adjustment it only makes the trees stand out. The trails are quiet though and normally this place is crowded with hikers sometimes causing traffic jams. Within Bukhansan National Park you can see up to 1300 different kinds of flora and fauna, Bukhansanseong Fortress with over 2000 years of history and over 100 Buddhist Temples and monk cells. Bukhansan is also a birder’s paradise with a chance to see among other species the great spotted woodpecker. On this day I’m just going to have to settle for this spotted cat! I was getting closer to Jaunbong Peak but with the skies appearing to become darker the threat of rain was looming. I was hoping I would make it all the way to the top before a downpour. When it rains in this part of the world the showers are fierce and sometimes torrential. In East Asia you have to be prepared with rain gear, like a poncho or an umbrella, so long as there’s no lightning. With the heat and humidity in the summer months jackets, unless they are of the lightest material, will most likely cause you to melt. Because the skies were cloudy with the possibility of rain few hikers were here. Normally on a sunny day this trail can be backed up with people trying to get to the top. Wow, this was really a special feeling in the mountains of South Korea, only 20km from the border of North Korea amongst these beautiful rock formations. Just can’t see past these rocky of Dobongsan but on a sunny day this small area of Jaunbong would be packed with people. Oh yeah, gotta get the selfie in here. Hey think about it, if they had this ability back in the day do you realize Edmund Hillary would have actually had a picture of himself on the top of Mt. Everest. So laugh if you will but they are a great way to record your achievement. OK not even close to anything in the Himalaya let alone Everest but a great day hike with some incredible scenery and guess what-it just started to rain as I made it to the top. I will definitely come back to explore more of Bukhansan National Park in South Korea. There are so many trails, interesting sites and temples that I can’t wait to see. Now where was that place I staked out earlier for a much earned beer. I know it’s somewhere around here…. Write A Podcast Review:
Jun 29, 2017
East Asia is such a super friendly place for foreigners with efficient subway or MRT lines throughout all major cities including Seoul, South Korea. All stations have English signs and all stops are announced in English. Namsan mountain is the most well-known of the four guardian mountains of Seoul with the famous landmark, Seoul N Tower topping the 262m peak. It’s not a challenging or particularly strenuous hike but it’s a nice break from the chaotic megalopolis below. It’s also a great way to join locals in their everyday activities and experience the fitness and hiking culture of the city. If you start your hike from the gondola station it’s extremely easy to find your way with signs in English everywhere. This is more like a vigorous walk in a park than a mountain hike. No rough trails to deal with. Stairs everywhere and there’s even rubberized sections of the trail to lessen the impact of hiking on a hard surface. When it comes to activities like this Koreans really know how to makes things comfortable. This may look like a road but it’s pedestrian only! On the way you’ll see sites you can check out like Waryongmyo, a Buddhist/Daoist/Shamanist Shrine dedicated to Zhuge Liang, a Chinese statesman and general who lived from 181-234 AD. As you meander up the trail you’ll start to get views of Seoul and the surrounding mountains. It’s a wonderful way to appreciated the city where half the population of the country lives. It’s easy to enjoy the serene atmosphere of the walk up Namsan. You’ll also have views of N Seoul Tower. The N stands for Namsan, nature and New look from a 2005 15 billion won remodelling project. Namsan is a popular place for Seoulites to visit on the weekend with many spots available for picnics and other outdoor activities. Namsan is considered Seoul’s principal park. It averages 23,000 visits a day. Every April a Cherry blossom festival takes place across Seoul with the longest avenue of Cherry trees anywhere in the city at Namsan mountain. There was a haze and clouds over the surrounding mountains of Seoul on the day I visited Namsan. There are 37 mountains in the greater Seoul area, many easily accessed by subway or bus. One of the most fascinating things I saw along the hike was Sukhojung, an archery field that dates back to 1630, still in operation today. Archery had played a prominent role in the defence of the country, particularly on Namsan mountain, one of the sites of The Fortress Wall of Seoul, the shield that protected the city from invaders. This outdoor gym was a sign I was getting closer to the direct stairs to the top of the mountain. As you get higher each step has a built in rubber cushion making it a little easier on the knees and joints. Koreans are real outdoor enthusiasts that also appreciate making the activity comfortable and convenient with covered rest areas, washrooms, and these wonderfully comfortable stairs. As I was on final approach to the top, with the tower now in direct sight the views opened up to show even though this is one of the most densely populated places in the world there are still large visible green spaces in greater Seoul. Follow Namsan’s portion of the Fortress Wall of Seoul, first constructed in 1396, and you’ll understand the strategic importance of the four guardian mountains and this wall that protected the city during the Joeson Dynasty. When I reached the top I was just in time for the patrolling and lighting ceremony reenactment of Namsan Bongsudae. There were 5 Bondsudae stations on Namsan during the Joeson Dynasty used to communicate political and military information to the king with beacons. Bongsu is the combination of the words bong, meaning torchlight, and su, meaning smoke. At the peak of the Joeson Dynasty there were 673 beacons located throughout the Korean peninsula. This Bongsudae on Namsan was reconstructed in 1993. It was an extremely warm and humid day so these sprinklers were a relief from the heat for everyone. More views directly under N Seoul Tower, which has been open to the public and showcasing views of the city and surrounding area since 1980. These locks underneath the tower are symbols of love from the countless dates that have taken place here over time. You can check out how many different languages love messages are written in, on these symbols of a forever lasting love. Or leave your own, but it looks like all the good views are gone. I like everyday activities, like cycling, hiking or walking in an urban area I’m visiting. The feeling of participating in the same daily workout or exercise that locals enjoy, like Namsan Mountain, makes me feel more engaged and like I’m actually living in the place rather than just being a sightseer or tourist. Next time you’re in Seoul, South Korea try hiking one of the mountains for a break from the busy city, a sense of touching everyday life, maybe even a little bit of history, and some pretty amazing views.
Jun 25, 2017
I will confess right up front! I am not a meat-eater so that’s why you don’t see me trying anything that has meat in it at this year’s Food Taipei. I do eat fish and seafood but for many years now I have not eaten, beef, chicken, pork, or any other animal. That may sound like a challenging diet to uphold especially in East Asia but that’s not the case at all. In fact, Taiwan and specifically Taipei is a fantastic city to be a complete vegetarian or even vegan for that matter. Recently PETA Asia voted Taipei the number vegan-friendly city in Asia followed by Singapore. There are lots of modern or contemporary vegan style restaurants in the city but it’s also the traditional vegetarian buffet style restaurants that are popular with the Buddhist community that help to make it a convenient place for vegans. So of course my tasting of some of the snacks and food at this year’s Food Taipei show, one of the biggest of it’s kind in East Asia, leaned towards vegetarian with a few seafood treats throw in. All of this food is delicious and I believe even if you are a meat eater you would still enjoy these snacks at or in between regular meals. This was a great show held over three days at two sites, the Taipei World Trade Center and Nangang Exhibition Center. Food exhibitors from all over the world come to this Food Taipei every year to showcase their products but I was more interested in sharing Asian food, particularly some of the products and specialities of Taiwan. Hope you enjoy the video and subscribe to the channel! Please feel free to leave comments. I would love to get your feedback on what else you would like to see as I continue to explore Asia and the Far East. For as little as $1/month you can become a sponsor of my channel and the Far East Adventure Travel Podcasts and have access to exclusive content along with other offers. Visit my Patreon page to find out more:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4035923 Support Far East Adventure Travel-Write a Review in iTunes-https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/adventure-travel-far-east-inspired-by-rick-steves-lonely/id890305531?mt=2 Music courtesy of:http://www.purple-planet.com
Jun 20, 2017
How do you figure out which temples to see in Bangkok when there are over 400 of them? Here are the top 3 that should be on anyone’s list. I’ll explore more in another episode but here’s where to start. This may be enough for your first trip to Bangkok, Thailand. Let’s start the tour! Number 3, Wat Arun. Even though it’s name means temple of dawn this is a wonderful site best enjoyed at sunset. Located on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River, some consider it the most beautiful temple in Thailand. It’s prang or spire on the banks of the river is a world-class landmark. At the time of my visit, Wat Arun was undergoing major renovations as you can see by the scaffolding. Wat Arun held the great Emerald Buddha before it was transferred to Wat Phra Kaew at the Grand Palace. In fact the temple was part of the grounds of the royal palace where it was located before it was moved in 1785. Wat Arun glistens in the golden hour at sunset. It’s intricate craftmanship of tiny pieces of glass and Chinese porcelain artfully placed on the prang and other structures is an unforgettable site. You can get to Wat Arun via Tha Tien Pier also called Pier 8 right after you visit the number 2 temple. Wat Pho, home of the reclining Buddha. This temple complex is perfect for just wandering as most people will show up, check out the 46 meter long Buddha and immediately leave. You’ll have lots of space to enjoy the atmosphere of a world-class heritage site and the largest collection of Buddha statues in Thailand. Wat Pho was the first public university in the country and is also home to the top massage school. This is where you can experience a more therapeutic rather than soothing massage. Book ahead otherwise you may have a long wait which can eat into precious exploring time. Of course you also want to savour the presence of this incredible reclining Buddha that’s covered in gold leaf. This image is the Buddha entering Nirvana thus ending reincarnations. The statue is 46 meters long and 15 meters high with the soles of the feet at 3 meters height and inlaid with mother of pearl. There are 108 bronze bowls in the corridor representing the 108 auspicious characters of the Buddha. You can purchase a bowl of coins you can use to drop in the bowls for good fortune, which also aids the monks in preserving the reclining Buddha and Wat Pho. The sound the coins make when dropping is pretty cool in the giant hall. Wat Pho is within walking distance of the number one temple to visit in Bangkok, Wat Phra Kaew or the temple of the Emerald Buddha, located within the Grand Palace complex. Because Wat Phra Kaew doesn’t house any monks it is more like a personal chapel for the royal family than an actual temple. The emerald Buddha is considered the palladium of the Kingdom of Thailand. It is made of a single block of jade and is 66 centimeters or 26 inches high, cloaked in three different gold costumes appropriate for the three seasons, wet and hot, and winter, the cool season. No photographs or video are allowed inside the chapel but you can spend as much time as you like enjoying the Buddha and interior of the structure. This is the spiritual heart of Thailand and the top tourist attraction of Bangkok with thousands of visitors daily. There is a dress code and you will be stopped by officials if your clothing is deemed inappropriate. I’ll leave a link in the video description for your reference. In fact most if not all Buddhist temples in Thailand have specific requirements for appropriate clothing. The Grand Palace is crowded and most of the time, an extremely hot place with no air conditioning so pace yourself. To avoid some of the bigger crowds it’s best to start as early as possible, the complex opens at 8:30 everyday. Conceivably you could see all top 3 temples in one day. Starting out at The Grand Palace, then stopping for a coffee or tea beak in a cool cafe around Tha Thien or Pier 8, which is close by Wat Pho and the reclining Buddha. Then visiting Wat Pho before a leisurely lunch around Tha Tien. Then finishing off your tour with a river crossing to Wat Arun in the late afternoon and perhaps enjoying the sunset from one of the best spots in the city. Help others discover Far East Adventure Travel in iTunes! Write a Review: Dress Code For Royal Urn at Grand Palace-Bangkok, Thailand: Regular Dress Code: Music Credits Indore Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Mystic Force Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0
Jun 16, 2017
Taipei, Taiwan has one of the most efficient and reliable MRT or public rapid transit systems in the world. Locals are used to the convenience but if you are visiting either for a short or extended time to Taipei you are in store for a comfortable, safe, and easy way to get around the city. There are 5 main lines of the Taipei Metro which consists of a mix of underground and above ground infrastructure with a total of 108 stations. This does not include the airport service as this is a separate entity called Taoyuan MRT. I highly recommend downloading either the IOS or android Taipei MRT app available in The App Store and Google Play. This will help you plan your day while you’re having a coffee in your hotel room or at breakfast. All of the stations are also searchable online with full descriptions including in most cases major sites that are close by. You can purchase single journey tokens but you’ll save alot of time, especially if you’re traveling during rush hour, to pick up either a TaipeiPass card or an Easycard. You can purchase TaipeiPass cards at any MRT station and at most convenient stores including 7-Eleven. They are available in 1,2,3, and 5 day unlimited use cards. There is also an additional 1 day + card that can be used on the Maokong Gondola next to the Taipei Zoo. These passes are for unlimited use on the Taipei Metro, not including bus routes with four digit buses for their time frame so there’s no lead to load or reload them. TaipeiPass Cards: If you’re planning on taking some bus trips or train rides to Northern Taiwan besides using the MRT then you may want to purchase an Easycard instead for NT$100. You’ll have to load money onto it but the EasyCard is more flexible than the TaipeiPass. EasyCards can be purchased at all MRT stations. Using the Easycard gives you a 20% discount on single journey fares on the MRT and 10% on local trains to Keelung and Ruifang. Keelung has one of the most famous night markets on the island, Keelung Miaokou Night Market. Ruifang is your connection to Pingxi, home of the world-famous Sky Lantern Festival. The Taipei MRT system operates between 6am-12am but service ends earlier at some stations. Here is a link that gives the last train time for each station:http://english.metro.taipei/ct.asp?xItem=1056375&CtNode=70242&mp=122036 Music courtesy of:http://www.purple-planet.com Become a sponsor of Far East Adventure Travel! Visit my Patreon page now!: Help others discover Far East Adventure Travel! Write a Review:
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