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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic

Far East Adventure Travel. Inspiring, entertaining. Let John Saboe take you on journeys filled with spiritual celebrations and rituals, ancient festivals, wildlife safaris, trekking and climbing quests and vast array of food cultures. Learn about village life, cultural differences, urban exploration, street food, history and architecture. Visit Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, and Korea. Stories and advice from one of the most exciting destinations on the planet-Asia.
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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic
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Now displaying: August, 2017
Aug 31, 2017
fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Thanks so much for visiting my crowdfunding page! Your support will help me to create even better podcasts from Asia! Bangkok, Thailand has been one of the top 3 cities visited in the world for some time now. It's no surprise when you start discovering what Bangkok is all about. History, tradition, culture, shopping, food, and notorious red light districts. It's also of course a hub for Southeast Asia and a bridge to the middle east and Europe. On my most recent visit I saw for myself the clear sidewalks void of the famous street vendors of Bangkok. This has been reported for many weeks now but this was my first-hand look at the current street food situation. There are stalls to be found if you look around Chinatown, some of the tourist streets like Khao San Road but the vendors are gone all around Pratunam and the streets around Siam Paragon and Central World. It's disappointing but it's happening around other major cities in Southeast Asia, like Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi. Governments in some cases want the sidewalks free of clutter so it's safer for pedestrians. That's certainly a valid concern for a city like Ho Chi Minh where it can be quite dangerous walking around stalls and parked motorbikes. It may just be the new reality of Southeast Asia. It may also be an opportunity for countries like Laos, Cambodia and Myanmar that are still considerably undeveloped and have plenty of growth opportunity with their tourism industries compared with a giant like Thailand. Regardless Bangkok is still an amazing city worth spending several days visiting. You'll no doubt end up in Pratunam, considered by most the center of modern and luxury shopping in Southeast Asia. Join me for an evening walk in Bangkok's shopping mecca district.
Aug 29, 2017
fundly.com/far-east-adventure-travel-video-production-improvements Thanks so much for taking the time to view my crowdfunding page. I continue to strive to bring you better video content from Asia. I'm extremely grateful for your support whether it's $5, $10, $20 or more. In order for me to make what I do sustainable I need to expand my video on YouTube as well as continue to grow my livestreaming base and of course what started it all, the video podcast! Thank you for your support! For me a visit to Bangkok is not complete without a trip to see the Erawan Shrine, in the heart of Pratunam and the shopping district. The contrast between modern shopping, elevated trains, and the 4 headed Brahma shrine is sharp and unlike any city in the west. Unfortunately the shrine gained international attention in August 2015 when a bomb was set off there killing 20 people and injuring 125. Today there is still no conclusive evidence of who or why the bomb was detonated at the shrine. The Erawan Shrine was actually placed on this site because of bad luck believed to have been caused by laying the foundation for the Erawan Hotel on the wrong date. The builders consulted an astrologer who advised them to put the shrine on the site to counter the bad karma. In 1987 the Erawan Hotel was demolished making room for the Grand Hyatt Erawan Hotel. Thai traditional dancers sing and perform for worshippers who pay a fee. You can order the full deck of dancers-8, or just 2 who will sing and dance while you pray. A live band accompanies the singers. The music, singing, and intense smell of incense against the backdrop of the biggest shopping district in Southeast Asia is intoxicating and addictive. I'll always visit the Erawan Shrine!
Aug 19, 2017
patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel - Please visit my Patreon page to see the latest offers. For as little as $1/month you can get access to exclusive content. It's always challenging when you visit any city for the first time to decide on where exactly you want to stay. This video highlights my 5 favorite districts to stay in Taipei. The characteristics of each district are highlighted to make it easier to decide which one suits you best. Technically Taipei Main Station is not a district but falls in Zhongzheng but I think it's better to use Taipei Main Station when you're searching for hotels and other retail or services. The districts fall in order of transportation convenience with number 1 Taipei Main Station being the best and Xinyi District the area furthest away. Taipei City is not that expansive so if you stay in Xinyi it will take you approximately 20 minutes to get to Taipei Main Station by MRT. Zhongshan is convenient and has a some nice sites to visit including the Ningxia Night Market, Dihua Old Street, The Museum of Contemporary Art. Daan is great for shoppers, foodies, bar hoppers, and some nice parks and neighborhoods to explore. Ximending is the most energetic district with lots of choices for food, cafes, entertainment, street performers, and is completely safe even with the crowds that inhabit the place every night. Xinyi is the most luxurious of all the districts with the best selection of 5 star hotels, international restaurants, Chinese/Taiwanese fine dining, and the best Japanese food. Bars, hot nightclubs and one of the best selections of luxury goods stores in East Asia. Thanks so much for watching the video! Please subscribe to the channel for the latest videos from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and South Asia! Music: http://www.purple-planet.com
Aug 7, 2017
Far East Adventure Travel relies on viewer support to cover travel, broadcast, and production costs! Become a sponsor and patron now! Visit patreon.com to see exclusive offers: I thought it might be interesting for those who subscribe to the podcast and are curious about life in a place that faces typhoons regularly and might be traveling to Taiwan in the future see what it’s like to go through the hours leading up to a typhoon. I get many followers asking me about safety and what to do before and during a typhoon in Taiwan. I’m also thinking that Taiwanese who follow the channel will find it humorous to watch a foreigner talk about a typhoon and how we perhaps perceive it as more of an event than just an actual weather occurrence. I mentioned focustaiwan.tw as a good English language resource for foreigners in Taiwan. Taiwan television always has extensive coverage leading up to and during a typhoon but unfortunately it is only available in Mandarin. Of course you can also use apps like Windy or Storm to give you up to date weather information but I like Focus Taiwan for comprehensive coverage which includes transportation and other useful information. Of course flights will most likely be delayed or cancelled during a typhoon so if you do have travel plans that fall close to a typhoon you’ll have to stay up to date with your airlines as flights will either be delayed, or in some cases moved up to depart earlier than scheduled. The government can also call a “typhoon day” which means all services, offices, and schools will be closed. If a “typhoon day” is called it may also mean that many stores will be closed. Having some extra food and drinks on hand can be helpful if you’re in a smaller town or city in Taiwan but I’ve found especially if you’re in Taipei there are usually enough stores, cafes, and restaurants open to find something to eat. Of course this will also depend on the severity of the typhoon so there are exceptions. Having been through several typhoons now I am much more used to them as just part of the weather season but I still find following and tracking a typhoon extremely fascinating. Help others discover Far East Adventure Travel! Write a review in the iTunes Store:
Aug 3, 2017
Kyoto is located in the central part of Honshu Island, Japan and was the imperial capital of the country for over a thousand years. It is also known as the City of Ten Thousand Shrines. It is an absolute must see on a visit to Japan. To get some expert advice on how best to spend your time and get the most out of your stay in the city I spoke with Niall Gibson expert guide, travel planner and managing director of kyotofun.com and myjapanadventure.com. from his home Kyoto. And please some advice on how to conduct yourself in this polite culture. I first set off on foot near the Yasaka Shrine To get a feel for the city. Wait a minute what the hell is this? Hari Kirshnas? In Kyoto? Well it’s an international city so anything is possible but not my idea of traditional Japanese culture. So I moved on to the Heian Shrine. It is a top ranked shrine by the Association of Shinto Shrines. Heian dates back to 1895, a relatively short history compared to other important temples and shrines in Japan. Outside the shrine on a busy road in Kyoto sits It’s Torii Gate, one of the largest in Japan. Built in 1929 it’s over 24 meters high. A torri gate symbolizes the transition from the profane to the sacred. The orange, green and white buildings inside are meant to be replicas of the old Kyoto Imperial Palace. The Heian Shrine’s gardens are some of the most impressive in all of Japan. If you’re timing is good you’ll see a stunning display of cherry blossoms in the spring. If you’re timing is good…. No matter what time of year taking a stroll through the gardens is a true zen experience, and hey you can even step over these stones. The same ones Scarlett Johansson hopped over in “Lost In Translation”. I left the Heian Shrine totally refreshed from my walk through the gardens and headed back to Gion to take a walk through this traditional neighborhood, where I’ve been told real Geisha’s can be seen. Actually the correct term or name for a Geisha in Kyoto is Geiko and an apprentice is called a Maiko. But my best sighting was just the many tourists who come and dress up in traditional kimonos and walk around and pose for pictures. I took another suggestion from Niall and made my way to Arishiyama, about a 30 minute train ride from central Kyoto to see the Tenru ji Buddhist Temple and finish off my visit with a walk through the world-famous Bamboo Grove. Arishiyama is home to several temples and interesting sites to see including a monkey park where over 170 monkeys reside. It’s also a spectacular place to visit for the beautiful scenery of the surrounding mountains, especially during the spring and fall. I made my way to Tenru ji-the head temple of the Tenru branch of Rinzai Zen Buddhism. Construction was completed in 1345 but the temple has subsequently suffered through many fires and the buildings that currently stand here were reconstructed in the last half of the 19 and early 20th centuries. Tenru ji is surrounded by beautiful gardens and was designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 1994. It’s North Gate is the entrance to the famous Sagano Bamboo Grove. It’s no coincidence that bamboo gardens or groves in Japan are usually situated near Shinto Shrines or Buddhist Temples. The bamboo represents strength, a symbol intended to ward off evil.If you want to truly experience the wonder of this place and it’s magical sounds, visit early in the morning or late in the day. That’s it for this week’s Far East Adventure Travel Podcast. Don’t forget to like the Far East Adventure Travel page on Facebook and for more inspiration subscribe to John Saboe on YouTube:http://bit.ly/2ni8SSjyoutube visit fareastadventuretravel.com Until next time this is John Saboe. Safe travels and Namaste!
Aug 1, 2017
Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park is made up of 5 small islands between 5-8 kilometers off of Kota Kinabalu in Sabah Malaysian Borneo. In this episode I’m heading for one of the smallest, Pulau Sapi, or Cow Island. It’s one of the least developed areas of the park. Great beaches, diving and snorkeling with a bonus chance of seeing some monitor lizards up close in the wild. Sapi Island can be reached by boat from the Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal in KK. You can purchase a ticket directly to the island or get a multi-island ticket. This is a half-day or day trip for most. There are no hotels on Sapi but with prior permission from the park’s office you could camp there. Pulau Gaya, the largest island in the group at 3700 acres compared to Sapi at just 25 has resorts and more amenities. This is one of the finest beaches in the park. I’ll spend a little time here but first I’ll do a quick hike around the island where I may see the lizards and some macaques. This is the map I had to work with, not exactly detailed but the island is only 25 acres. In the worst case I’ll just swim if I get lost on land. Right out of the gate I get a quick glimpse of a monitor lizard but it quickly dashes into the forest. The trail that runs the perimeter of the island takes about 45 minutes to hike around with some nice little private beaches you can stop at along the way. Here’s a pretty cool adventure. Take a boat to Pulau Gaya, then zipline to Pulau Sapi. You can reach speeds of up to 50km/hr on the 250 meter crossing of the two islands. It’s also possible to swim from island to island, but as there are no lifeguards there, do it at your own risk. Back near the center of activity on Sapi close to the main beach and bbq area I found the biggest gathering of monitor lizards. These are actually water monitors, locally they’re called biawak. The males can reach up to 3 meters in length and weigh up to 50 kilos. They are very adept at swimming, and can stay underwater for up to a half-hour so watch out! You may see them catching a wave next to you. They’re more scavenger then predator so you probably won’t find them attacking people unless you get to close in their space, like some foolish tourists who try to include them in their selfie. These lizards carry a deadly bacteria in their mouth and their claws could tear a sizable chunk of flesh out of you so be careful. Monitors defend themselves with their tails, claws and jaws. These lizards are carnivores and will eat birds, rodents, snakes, crabs and even carrion, similiar to their bigger cousin The Komodo Dragon. Their main hunting technique is to run after their prey once spotted. They also have an amazing one way breathing system that can be traced back to dinosaurs. Pulau Sapi was a great half-day getaway from Kota Kinabalu and in between bigger Borneo trips. An easy boat ride gets you to a pretty nice spot for beach, relaxation, absorbing recent travel and cultural experiences, and even a little exotic animal viewing. It’s back on the boat to KK and more adventure in Malaysian Borneo with Far East Adventure Travel The Podcast, I’m John Saboe, Thanks for joining me, safe travels and Namaste!. "KKMap3". Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:KKMap3.png#/media/File:KKMap3.png
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