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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic

Far East Adventure Travel. Inspiring, entertaining. Let John Saboe take you on journeys filled with spiritual celebrations and rituals, ancient festivals, wildlife safaris, trekking and climbing quests and vast array of food cultures. Learn about village life, cultural differences, urban exploration, street food, history and architecture. Visit Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, and Korea. Stories and advice from one of the most exciting destinations on the planet-Asia.
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Now displaying: Category: india
Jul 24, 2017
Support Far East Adventure Travel by becoming a patron! Visit patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel to see exclusive offers starting at $1/month! Support Far East Adventure Travel by becoming a patron! Visit:patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel Mumbai is a fantastic city to visit with plenty of sites, heritage buildings, amazing street and restaurants. There are some things you need to be prepared for before you arrive. As I stated in part I you need to pace yourself to the incredibly stifling climate with breaks in air conditioned cafes, restaurants or shops. Staying hydrated is extremely important as any sign of fatigue will cause you problems with the next challenge, dealing with beggars. This unfortunately is the reality of major Indian cities and the beggars of Mumbai are relentless. Watching how locals react when they are approached is a great way to learn. You’ll notice that they do not respond at all to them and in fact are almost oblivious to their presence. This is probably the best way to handle beggars. If they see no reaction and cannot disturb you in any way they usually give up. The beggars job is not just to make you sympathetic, they are trying to agitate you in any way they can. If you get angry, frustrated, or emotional at all, they will continue to bother you until you give in. If you act like they aren’t there they’ll give up. You should always be cautious of where you are taking photographs around Mumbai. With a history of terrorist attacks police and authorities are sensitive to photography around certain sites. Photography is not permitted at the high and low courts, inside the C.S.T. train station, and the Bombay Stock Exchange. There was a heritage tour inside C.S.T. that apparently allowed photography but I’m not sure if it still exists. It’s always best to ask either security or if there are police at a particular site you’re interested in photographing. Crawford Market officially renamed Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Market after a 19th century social reformer is one of the most famous markets of Mumbai where you can get everything from fish to fruits and vegetables and even live birds, dogs, cats, and other pets. Here’s a somewhat unconventional thing to do when visiting Mumbai. Head to Bandra in West Mumbai, considered the queen of suburbs and home to many famous politicians, cricket players, and Bollywood stars including one of the biggest ever, Shah Rukh Khan. Check out the locals who often hang outside his mansion waiting to catch a glimpse of the King of Bollywood! OK, let’s try talking to someone else. You can also visit the homes of Amitabh Bachchan, considered one of India’s greatest cinema actors of all time. Most taxi and autorickshaw drivers of the area know where all of these mansions are located. They’re happy to take you there! Thanks so much for watching the video! If you enjoyed it please give me a thumbs up and subscribe to the channel for more videos from East Asia, Southeast Asia and South Asia! Photo Credits-Shah Rukh Khan, Amitabh Bachchan:By http://www.bollywoodhungama.com Music:http://www.purple-planet.com
Jul 18, 2017
Thanks so much for listening and subscribing to the podcast. Mumbai is one of my favorite cities to visit in India. Not only is it loaded with atmosphere and amazing heritage buildings from the British raj, it’s also where you can find some of the best street food and restaurants in the country. One of the most enjoyable experiences for me was sampling the incredible street food in Kala Ghoda and the row of stalls across the street from CST. Not only are the dishes absolutely delicious but the atmosphere in which they are consumed is wonderful with lawyers taking a break from the nearby law courts in traditional robes mixing with everyday working people from the area. There are definitely things to be cautious of when walking around Mumbai, especially the traffic which can be overwhelming for some. As well you will soon see that locals do not wait for green lights to cross a street so if you want to follow in their footsteps, extreme caution is advised. Beggars are also a concern. As a foreigner you will no doubt be approached by many. Unless you want a parade of them following you it’s best not to give them anything. They also approach locals but you will quickly notice that natives will not give them the time of day and simply move on as if they are not affected by the encounter. Showing no emotion will show them there is no hope so they will move on. Pacing yourself in the tropical heat and humidity is also extremely important. As I mention in the podcast, taking breaks in cafes and museums throughout your day of exploring will help you stay comfortable. Support Far East Adventure Travel with your pledge to my Patreon page! Visit now and discover great offers starting at $1/month:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4035923 Write a Review in the iTunes Store and help others discover Far East Adventure Travel: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/adventure-travel-far-east-inspired-by-rick-steves-lonely/id890305531?mt=2
Jul 31, 2016
[caption id="attachment_3303" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]An ancient Chinese fishing net and traditional fishing boats are still used to catch a variety of fish and creatures from the sea in Fort Cochin-Kerala, India An ancient Chinese fishing net and traditional fishing boats are still used to catch a variety of fish and creatures from the sea in Fort Cochin-Kerala, India[/caption] Kerala is one of my favorite states to travel through in India. It has an interesting history filled with some of the most varied culture and religion in all of the country. Fort Cochin at 35% has the highest per capital Christian population in India. Coupled with a smoothly assimilated remainder of mostly Hindu and Muslims, the feeling of harmony amongst the groups could be the highest than anywhere else in India. Kerala also boasts the highest literacy rate in the country, 93%, and the highest life expectancy, 77 years. Spices have been exported from the region since 3000 B.C. Walking through the streets and alleys of Matancherry next to Fort Cochin can still feel romantic and like a slice from another time with small warehouses piled high with sacks of nutmeg, mace, cumin and many other spices. Much of which is used in Ayurvedic medicine, one of the main reasons tourists visit the state. Ayurvedic clinics, yoga retreats, beach side resorts and backwater houseboat cruises are some of the most popular draws to Kerala. On my last visit to Kerala I spent a few weeks in the Fort Cochin area before traveling further south to the beach towns of Varkala and Kovalam, with stops in the capital, Thiruvananthapuram, or the older and easier name to pronounce, Trivandrum, as well as the backwater capital Alleppey. Join me in this episode of Far East Adventure Travel for live stream highlights of "God's Own Country"-Kerala, India.
Jul 27, 2016
[caption id="attachment_3293" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]Mumbai's most famous landmark, The Gateway of India is one of the most visited sites in the country's largest city. One of the highlights of Far East Adventure Travel-Best of "Live" Mumbai's most famous landmark, The Gateway of India is one of the most visited sites in the country's largest city. One of the highlights of Far East Adventure Travel-Best of "Live"[/caption] Mumbai, India is one of the most exciting destinations in South Asia. Easily the richest city in the region, the most expensive private home in the world is located there, it's a roller coaster ride of experiences from visiting neighborhoods filled with British "Raj" architecture, holy sites, crazy markets, and yes even long stretches of beaches, just don't go in for a swim. On my most recent visit I spent two weeks wandering the city streets, traveling on local buses, taxis, even taking a boat ride to Elephanta Island. It can be an overwhelming experience for those especially not accustomed to such a huge population, over 22 million in the greater Mumbai area. On top of that there are areas with high security due to past terrorist attacks, photography prohibited in some places, seriously determined professional beggars working the streets, not just targeting tourists, and crazy traffic. Still it's a must visit if you consider yourself a serious traveler. This past year Lonely Planet named it one of their top 10 cities to visit in 2016. Join me in a Far East Adventure Travel Best of "Live" for moments on the streets of Mumbai. From the famous stretch of beach known as Chowpatty to one of the busiest train stations in the world, Chatrapati Shivaji Terminus. You'll see why they call Mumbai the "Maximum City".
May 27, 2016

The Khali Temple in the Khalighat section of Kolkata, India. I was here with my friend Subroto who was showing me the area. This is also where Mother Teresa’s home for the Dying Destitute is located. And it’s also where you can find Bhola The Goat. Yes, this goat is named Bhola, and he is cared for by the people of the temple.

Up until now I’ve never seen anything quite like Bhola. He seemed larger than your average goat with personality to go with his size.

He’s apparently well known around here. Not only for his size and presence, love the henna died coat, but also for his tricks. His handler wanted to show his moves to us.

We were told he is well cared for and is considered almost sacred by the temple. It’s a miracle in itself considering they sacrifice his brother goats there to the God Khali all the time.

He must be well cared for. What goat would want to do this unless there’s something in it for him. Oh and I was told he likes whisky. Maybe that’s why he’s so cooperative and also because he knows he’s always close to death’s door.

These men who came by know Bhola and some of his bad habits like smoking. Yes apparently he likes smoking too, at least someone taught him how to. But today it looks like he’s only interested in eating cigarettes not smoking them, which can’t be good either.

The whole point of this story? Only in India is it possible to see a very famous temple, a home for the dying started by a saint to be and a smoking, whisky drinking goat that can do tricks all in the same block.

The post Temples, Gods, And A Whisky Drinking Goat-Kolkata, India appeared first on Far East Adventure Travel.

May 26, 2016

This is the Hindu pilgrimage town of Pushkar in Rajasthan, India. I came here for the annual Pushkar Camel Fair. When camel traders and animal herders ascend on this town with 50,000 horses, cattle, and the star attraction, the camels.

Pushkar is like no other town in India you will visit. The village area wraps around Pushkar Lake, considered one of the great Hindu pilgrimages of India. Some of Mahatma Ghandi’s mortal remains were scattered from a ghat or staircase at the lake. That ghat now bears his name.

The town itself, complete with wandering cows, pandas or Hindu priests offering flowers and pujas for big baksheesh centers around the main street or Sadar Bazaar. It’s a mix of traveler hippie food joints, cafes and shops and ghats to the lake. Just a great mix of travelers, pilgrims, and locals here.

It’s also where you’ll find one of the only Brahma temples in the world. They’re waiting to enter after the midday break. Brahma is the Hindu creator God and of the few of these temples that exist, this one is the most prominent.

And these are the fairgrounds, where all the business of camels takes place. I arrived about 5 days before the official start of the fair. This is the time when you’ll see the most camels and trading.

It’s a hot, dry dusty environment, filled with every sound a camel could possibly make. Camel herders discipling and training the younger ones, a scene you could find just a little disturbing.
It’s pure India though, filled with constant movement, musicians and gypsies swirling around you for baksheesh and thousands of camels constantly on the move around the grounds. Sensory perception overload.

The fair takes place every year coinciding with Kartika poornima, sometimes called Devi-Diwali, the festival of lights of the gods. Pilgrims from all over India come to bath in the holy lake of Pushkar. When the business of camels concludes, the crazy fair begins with snake charmers, children balancing on tightropes and the giant bath in the lake.

What makes this gathering so special? For me it’s a window to nomadic life that still exists for these people, conducting business the same way for thousands of years. Maybe there’s cel phones and other modern aids used but a life centered around the movement of camels hasn’t changed.

The post Greatest Camel Show On Earth-Pushkar, India appeared first on Far East Adventure Travel.

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