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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic

Far East Adventure Travel. Inspiring, entertaining. Let John Saboe take you on journeys filled with spiritual celebrations and rituals, ancient festivals, wildlife safaris, trekking and climbing quests and vast array of food cultures. Learn about village life, cultural differences, urban exploration, street food, history and architecture. Visit Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, India, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Japan, and Korea. Stories and advice from one of the most exciting destinations on the planet-Asia.
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Adventure Travel, Far East: Inspired by Rick Steves, Lonely Planet, National Geographic
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Now displaying: Category: general
Aug 7, 2017
Far East Adventure Travel relies on viewer support to cover travel, broadcast, and production costs! Become a sponsor and patron now! Visit patreon.com to see exclusive offers: I thought it might be interesting for those who subscribe to the podcast and are curious about life in a place that faces typhoons regularly and might be traveling to Taiwan in the future see what it’s like to go through the hours leading up to a typhoon. I get many followers asking me about safety and what to do before and during a typhoon in Taiwan. I’m also thinking that Taiwanese who follow the channel will find it humorous to watch a foreigner talk about a typhoon and how we perhaps perceive it as more of an event than just an actual weather occurrence. I mentioned focustaiwan.tw as a good English language resource for foreigners in Taiwan. Taiwan television always has extensive coverage leading up to and during a typhoon but unfortunately it is only available in Mandarin. Of course you can also use apps like Windy or Storm to give you up to date weather information but I like Focus Taiwan for comprehensive coverage which includes transportation and other useful information. Of course flights will most likely be delayed or cancelled during a typhoon so if you do have travel plans that fall close to a typhoon you’ll have to stay up to date with your airlines as flights will either be delayed, or in some cases moved up to depart earlier than scheduled. The government can also call a “typhoon day” which means all services, offices, and schools will be closed. If a “typhoon day” is called it may also mean that many stores will be closed. Having some extra food and drinks on hand can be helpful if you’re in a smaller town or city in Taiwan but I’ve found especially if you’re in Taipei there are usually enough stores, cafes, and restaurants open to find something to eat. Of course this will also depend on the severity of the typhoon so there are exceptions. Having been through several typhoons now I am much more used to them as just part of the weather season but I still find following and tracking a typhoon extremely fascinating. Help others discover Far East Adventure Travel! Write a review in the iTunes Store:
Jul 29, 2017
Support production, broadcast, and travel costs by becoming a sponsor of Far East Adventure Travel! Visit my Patreon page to see the offers:patreon.com/FarEastAdventureTravel I find the history and relationships Taiwan has had with nations like the United States and Japan absolutely fascinating. Unfortunately due to the development and rapid growth particularly of Taipei and New Taipei City many buildings that were apart of the history of America's years of on island support are gone. The old U.S. Embassy has been replaced by the National Taxation Bureau. The U.S. Taiwan Defence Command is now the location of The Taipei Fine Arts Museum. I sense though that there are still places out there to be discovered and shared. Video Script: "In Zhongshan District, a vibrant area of Taipei where many luxury hotels are located sits an iconic building of the neighborhood with a past life deep rooted in American history. When it was first built the former U.S. Ambassador’s residence was originally used as the U.S. Embassy during the Japanese colonial period of Taiwan. At the time of it’s completion in 1926 it was considered one of the most beautiful buildings on the island. The Western design with square floor plan and Grecian columns originally served as an administrative office as well as living quarters for the ambassadors and their families. When the United States established a new embassy after WWII this became the residence of the ambassador. I liked that this building has been repurposed as a venue for films and a meeting place rather than a museum. I felt sitting in it’s converted atrium and enjoying the surroundings in an unhurried manner had alot more value as an experience then a walk through a building with roped off areas. Not only did I have a great time hanging out where a U.S. President once stayed I had a pretty interesting selection of movies I could choose to watch, from a documentary about an American photographer turned Buddhist monk to a Japanese man living with a bunch of cats. In 1950 the United States started deploying U.S. military personnel to the island to aid the Republic of China with training, support, and economic relief. Special Western style housing was built for personnel including this almost 14 hectare site in the Yangmingshan area of Taipei City where many houses still remain today. Some of the houses have been leased from the Bank of Taiwan and are occupied by local politicians, artists, and personnel of the American Institute in Taiwan, the defacto U.S. Embassy in Taipei. But it appears many are cafes. The most recent building of the U.S. Taiwan Defense Command era to spring back to life is the Yangminghsan U.S. Military Club, now a Cultural and Creative Park with American style restaurants. This was also the home of the Grass Mountain Teen Club for personnel families. The Bank of Taiwan and a local tech company have invested over $3 million dollars in the renovation which includes a vinyl listening room and museum. Yes they passed the taste test and there are some beautiful grounds and a rooftop deck to enjoy the spectacular Yangminghan Park setting." Getting To The Yangmingshan U.S. Military Housing and Brickyard 33 1/3:Take the Red Line MRT to Shilin, leave Exit 1 and walk to Zhongzheng Rd. Catch Bus #5 to Yangmingshan. The ride will be approximately 20 minutes before you'll get off at the Shanzihou Police Station stop. Walk across the street to Kaixuan Rd. You'll see signs for Brickyard, just follow those and you'll arrive there in about 5 minutes. This is also where you'll see many of the military houses that are either private, cafes, or empty. Getting To the Former U.S. Amassador's Residence(SPOT Taipei Film House) take the MRT Red Line to Zhongshan Station. Walk West along Nanjing East Road to Zongshan Rd. North. turn left and walk to #18. photos courtesy of http://taipics.com music: http://www.purple-planet.com
Jun 1, 2017
For me Singapore and Malaysia were my first introduction to the amazing food experience of dining outdoors in Southeast Asia. Many years later the Jalan Alor food street of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia is still one of my favorite places to dine. I've been lucky enough to have experienced the food and dining options of many cities and towns across Southeast Asia. Each one offers it's own unique food and charming experience whether it's sitting on tiny plastic chairs in the old quarter of Hanoi, Vietnam or enjoying the cheap vegetarian buffet in the night market of Luang Prabang, Laos while gazing at the Royal Palace's Temple at night. Jalan Alor is also one of the food centers I've visited the most having used KL as a gateway to Southeast Asia for several years. So I'm admittedly a little biased as well, but I've also never had a bad or even mediocre dining experience there. Jalan Alor is a tourist attraction but where some would find that perhaps not "authentic" I think it only adds to the experience with the possibility of sharing your dining experience with people from around the world, but mainly visitors from Asia. On my latest return I met a friendly group from Cambodia and some wonderful people from Iran. The restaurants have never let me down on Jalan Alor. The food is always consistently satisfying and being a seafood lover the options are almost limitless. My last meal consisted of grilled stingray, with a wonderful chili dipping sauce and deep-fried squid coated in a batter laced with squid eggs, it was so rich! I hope you enjoy this two part visit to one of my favorite places to eat in Southeast Asia, Jalan Alor-Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Help others discover the Far East Adventure Travel podcast! Write a review:https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/adventure-travel-far-east-inspired-by-rick-steves-lonely/id890305531?mt=2 Become a sponsor of Far East Adventure Travel and gain access to exclusive content! Visit:https://www.patreon.com/user?u=4035923
Oct 11, 2016
I was truly looking forward to live streaming much of my recent trek of the Annapurna Circuit in Nepal. This of course is one of the most popular hiking trails in the world with stunning views of the Annapurna range of the Himalaya. An opportunity to walk through a subtropical region, forest, and the outer edges of the Tibetan Plateau. One of the most varied landscapes to trek in the world topped off with authentic true villages, not merely trekking enclaves, with a chance to experience Nepal's rich culture of Hinduism and Buddhism. Unfortunately due to lack of infrastructure and technology it may be still awhile before live streaming in most of the regions becomes a reality. Armed with two sim cards and knowledge of which areas would have the best opportunity to broadcast live from I was disappointed when I arrived to find out there was just not enough bandwidth needed to stream via cellular data in almost all of these villages. The opportunity to show others a place that makes my heart sing, like Nepal's Himalaya and the Annapurna Circuit will for now will remain mostly a dream. I am happy to share the few rare moments where it was possible to stream via Periscope. In this episode of Far East Adventure Travel some highlights from the last stop on my Annapurna Circuit Trek from the town of Jomsom, Nepal.
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